Proud of our History – MV Codroy

by Darrell Mercer

Marine Atlantic, its predecessor CN Marine, and pre-confederation Newfoundland coastal boats have a strong and proud history serving the people of Atlantic Canada through ferry terminals, passenger vessels and rail service.

In this week’s “Throwback Thursday” blog posting we highlight the MV Codroy, a Newfoundland freight boat that served coastal communities, the Cabot Strait crossing and Caribbean trading routes between 1945 and 1964.

A member of the nicknamed “Splinter Fleet” or “Clarenville Boats”, the MV Codroy was one of ten small, wooden, diesel-powered vessels constructed at the Clarenville shipyard during the mid-1940s. Named after the Codroy Valley on Newfoundland’s west coast, it measured 135 feet in length and weighed 322 tonnes. While the vessel was primarily known for trading salt cod with Caribbean nations, returning with unique products such as Jamaican rum, and delivering freight to coastal communities, the vessel also provided service on the Cabot Strait when needed.

As always, we welcome your photos for posting in a future blog. Please email your photos to socialmedia@marineatlantic.ca including any facts such as the date and location.

In next week’s blog posting we highlight the MV Seatrader which served the Port aux Basques – North Sydney crossing from 1973-1976.